The Shed

The Shed
The Shed

Saturday, September 1, 2012

RIPE TOMATOES

Yes, it is that time of the growing season once again, when all of those wonderful crimson giants and tiny tasty red morsels arrive all at once, unexpected and in large numbers much like an IRS auditing unit although significantly more welcome. Yes, after 6 weeks of shamefaced slinkings into the Piggly-Wiggly to score a ripe Super Steak 'mater for the garden salad, you find yourself buried deeper in red than the national treasury.

Why, just look at we we're enjoying here at the Shed!


RUTGER'S TOMATOE'S RIPENING ON THE VINE
 
Olde German and Pruden's Purple (both heirloom varieties), ripening on Mr. Bears personal dancing table.



OLDE AND PRU, PERFECT TOGETHER

Super sweet Grape tomatoes delicious from the vine, as snacks, in salads or even cooked. (See this stuffed pepper recipe)


YUM!

Here is a popular old heirloom favorite variety that is available through virtually every seed company and at every garden store, after nearly vanishing from the scene a few decades back. Many of you recognize the distinct pinkish coloration of the Brandywine tomato.

THE BRANDYWINE HEIRLOOM TOMATO

This last but undeniably most delightful of ripe tomatoes seems to be in woefully short supply in our particular zone. But worth a gander never the less!

VIDARRUS GUERRUS

What to do with all this garden goodness? Share with friends and neighbors, open a roadside stand, make sauce*, or prepare and freeze tomato based soups! Canning and pickling are valid options as well.

Most important, tomato seeds are extraordinarily easy to save - a post on the topic is coming, never fear - and it is a rewarding practice. The Brandywine, Olde German and Prudens Purple shown are established open pollinated varieties.  Plants grown from their home-saved seeds generally give pleasantly reliable results.

This something to keep in mind; snow will be flying shortly and you will be planning the 2013 garden before you know it. Heirloom varieties yield genetically unmodified fruits and veggies and free you from the clutches of the Monsanto's of the world and their ilk**. 

Thanks as always for stopping by at Uncle Mac's garden Shed.


*THERE ARE PEOPLE, KIND, GENEROUS AND GOOD HEARTED FOLKS NO DOUBT WHO NEVER THE LESS REFER TO THE TOMATO PRODUCT MADE BY REDUCING RAW RIPE TOMATOES TO A THICKER, NICELY SEASONED SUBSTANCE TO BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH PASTA AS "GRAVY". THERE ARE OTHER, MORE BARBAROUS SITES FOR THESE FOLKS TO VISIT, IS ALL WE'RE SAYING.

**WE HAVE LITTLE USE FOR ILK, HERE AT THE SHED. 




4 comments:

Raymond Alexander Kukkee said...

Mac,all of those tomatoes are looking good! Even the saucy ones! We have a heritage tomato called "Sophie's choice" which seems to be a very early tomato that produces a dozen tomatoes on a very compact determinate plant.
We'll have about 70-90 gallons of tomatoes this year and make pizza sauce, tomato sauce, "HP" brown sauce, ketchup, tomato paste, canned tomatoes (100 quarts) salsa, and sun-dried tomatoes as well. Good stuff!

Mac Pike said...

Nice to see such self sufficiency Raymond; I really hope more and more people catch the bug.

For some reason, and I don't know what that reason is, I have much betterluck and yield with indeterminate varieties; although I'd prefer to grow the others.

Raymond Alexander Kukkee said...

Mac, last time we grew indeterminate tomatoes, they ended up 9' high and we had a hundred gallons of tomatoes...haha! Now we tend to 'defoliate' after the second set of tomatoes are formed on the indeterminate varieties so the plants don't grow much above 5' and the tomatoes tend to get bigger.

Glory Lennon said...

when I have too many tomatoes and not enough time to can I just chop them up and freeze them for later use in cooking. Good thing I have a big freezer.